Recent Reviews

25.09.2016

18.09.2016

11.09.2016

04.09.2016

28.08.2016

[ More Music Reviews ]


Freestone: The Temple Of Humanity

Freestone: The Temple Of Humanity

Melodic Rock
Rating: 4.0/5.0

My initial reaction when hearing of Freestone's mixing the tenets and mysticism of Freemasonry with music on 'The Temple Of Humanity' was, 'It sounds strange enough to be interesting.' But it's not so strange. After all, the Scandinavian black metal bands routinely blend norse paganism with music; Rush's Neil Peart looked to secular atheism and the philosophical objectivism of Ayn Rand for his lyrical inspiration. Freestone principal Harm Timmerman is a Freemason, and decided to merge the ideas with modern popular music. In the end, Timmernam has succeeded quite well.

Most people would probably associate Freemasonry with its popular symbols like the dollar bill or the 'National Treasure' movies rather than consider its history, philosophy or mysticism. It's more often perceived as a curious oddity and organization where men greet each other with secret handshakes and wear funny clothes. Essentially, however, it is a sect that preaches free thinking, the ultimate goodness of humanity, and the subsequent of evolution of man to a higher state of consciousness; all this is attained through the pursuit of the secret knowledge to which the elevated masters have attained. It's basically humanistic gnosticism (and an inherently flawed philosophical proposition). Now if, at this point, you don't sense a little mystery or mysticism in Freemasonry, then you will probably not get the tenor and taste of 'The Temple Of Humanity.'

The music is atmospheric melodic rock bordering on progressive rock; the arrangements intend to establish a mood of airy mysticism equal to its subject. Timmerman and company use elaborate and often provocative keyboard layers (The Ancient Of Days) and Floydish guitar work (Seven Step Staircase) to creative a sense of mystery and intrigue. This is further compounded by the controlled but provocative use of horns on many songs, the best being 'Brotherhood Of Men' and 'Masonry Dissected.' Yet, generally, the sum of this work is eerily mellow melodic rock with a mesmerizing effect: to bend your mind and proselytize you into the Brotherhood, or at least to pique your curiosity to explore more. But, I'm being over melodramatic now (or creepy, if you prefer).

In the end, Timmerman and Freestone's 'The Temple Of Humanity' is a noteworthy accomplishment for the character and quality of it smooth melodic progressive rock, and not just its blend of Freemasonry thought with music. Regardless of your current or future interest in this mysterious folklore, the intriguing music certainly portrays the character of Freemasonry well. Very recommended.

In Short

Harm Timmerman and Freestone's 'The Temple Of Humanity' is a noteworthy accomplishment for the character and quality of it smooth melodic progressive rock, and not just its blend of Freemasonry thought with music. Regardless of your current or future interest in this mysterious folklore, the intriguing music certainly portrays the character of Freemasonry well.

Find A Review

Alphabetical Index

a b c d e f g h i j
k l m n o p q r s t
u v w x y z #
Loading
Album of the Week
Click to read the Seven - Shattered CD album review

England's Seven had a bottle rocket-like existence between 1989 and 1990, spinning two singles in the latter year and performing with the likes of Richard Marx. Then they were gone. But some remembered them ... [ Read More ]