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Tomorrow's Eve: Mirror Of Creation III
Tomorrow's Eve - Mirror Of Creation III - Project Ikaros Music Review

Tomorrow's Eve: Mirror Of Creation III

Progressive Metal
5.0/5.0

Emerging from the "where have they been" file after ten years is Germany's Tomorrow's Eve. They've been AWOL from the studio since 2008's Tales From Serpentia. What have they been doing all these years? Press information is sketchy, but the obvious answer is working on new material for Mirror Of Creation III - Project Ikaros, their fifth album. Also adding to the confusion is when the album is releasing. Again, the PR one-sheet says April 27, whereas the band's official Facebook page suggests May 25. Which is it? Enquiring minds want to know. Nevertheless, let's get on to the album.

Tomorrow's Eve Band Photo

Tomorrow's Eve

To refresh your memory, or if you're a newbie, Tomorrow's Eve plays very sophisticated and stylish progressive metal akin to bands like Symphony X, Labyrinth, and Dream Theater. The core of their musical arrangements revolve around the compositions and contributions of founding members, guitarist Rainer Grund and keyboard player Oliver Schwickert. That is to say that in most every song you'll find several things. On the guitar side, you'll hear an abundance of riffage from harmonious to heavy, then complimented by thrilling solos. The keyboard side is a bit more complex: sprinkles for accent, a symphonic layer for orchestrated embellishment and, of course, many prolific solos, often in tandem with the guitar parts.


Expanding upon the song arrangements, you'll find them to be intricate and complex, yet never too perplexing that you can't grab hold. What prevents any musical cognitive dissonance is the simple fact that Grund and Schwickert hang all their compositions on the strong pins of melody. Additionally, and generally speaking, there's a recurring theme across Mirror Of Creation III, the juxtaposing of lighter parts with those heavier. Sometimes it comes with smooth piano segue followed by bracing riffage. Other times it can come within the vocal arrangement with vocalist Martin LeMar singing over soft parts, then raging with the aforementioned thick riffage. But he's never overwhelmed by the music, thanks to his vocal strength, but also from the clarity of the production.

Yet, with all these things, the listener must remain attentive. There's much going on over eleven songs and 69 minutes. For instance, you need to catch the groovy rhythm of the music and lyrics of Imago, and then the sweet bass and dream breakdown at the midpoint. Or with Dream Within A Dream, the song turns more upon rock groove in the riffs and rhythm section and a catchy refrain, rather than upon prog wonkery. Call it more AOR accessible melodic progressive rock. Then something like Terminal moves by power metal swiftness, yet again with a huge rock groove from the rhythm section. It's melodic and memorable, both in the music and lyrics. It reminded me of something Kamelot might do. With Somnium Ex Machina, you get a taste of piano and synth orchestration, before moving into big riffs from the guitar lines and steady beat and groove from the rhythm section. Schwickert drops in a swirling synth solo around three-quarters. Before the bombastic finish, a short piano and vocal segue lightens the heaviness. And there's more to explore, but I leave that to you.

Hopefully, there's enough information to pique your interest. If you love sophisticated and stylish, yet immediately accessible, melodic progressive metal, you will enjoy Tomorrow's Eve and Mirror Of Creation III. Get it. Quite recommended.



CraigHartranft.net - New fiction, crime fiction by Craig Hartranft

The Bottom Line

If you love sophisticated and stylish, yet immediately accessible, melodic progressive metal, you will enjoy Tomorrow's Eve and Mirror Of Creation III. Get it. Quite recommended.

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