Recent Reviews

18.06.2017

11.06.2017

04.06.2017

28.05.2017

21.05.2017

14.05.2017

[ More Music Reviews ]


THEO: The Game of Ouroboros
THEO - The Game of Ouroboros CD Album Review

THEO: The Game of Ouroboros

Progressive Rock
3.0/5.0

THEO is the creation of talented keyboard player Jim Alfredson. His background includes stints in blues and roots band, yet more recently in his jazz ensemble organissimo. His extensive experience revolves around the use of Hammond equipment (including the famous B3), which he started playing at the age of four. The Game of Ouroboros is his foray into melodic progressive rock.

Jim Alfredson Band Photo

Jim Alfredson

It's a concept album having something to do with a future, all imposing, conglomeration government and, then, how an individual might respond to this power. Musically, the focus, of course, is upon Alfredson's keyboard skills and presentation. In his own words, this was intentional, feeling that much of current progressive rock is too guitar-oriented. (It's not there isn't guitar work here. There's a fine solo within the title cut.) At the core, the songs seem to be piano based with Alfredson indulging himself by adding additional synth/organ layers. This includes using these devices for modest to liberal amounts of sound effects.

The overall feel of the album seems less towards traditional progressive rock, and more towards his recent jazz fusion excursions. I found this mostly within the title song, Idle Worship, and lesser in Exile. Of these three, the title track, The Game of Ouroboros, was the most satisfying of the bunch, nay, the best song on the whole album simply because it was the closet to classic prog rock. Exile only gets the prog rock groove going at the end.

Conversely, Idle Worship, early on, has some of that squirrelly keyboard play that unfortunately reminded me of Captain and Tennille's Muskrat Love. (Hate that song.) Yet, this doesn't last long and the rock-jazz fusion returns in the larger two-thirds of the song. After these things, a large portion of this album, The Blood That Floats My Throne, Creatures of Our Comfort, and These Are The Simple Days, seemed to swell with ambient rock, nearly sleepy and submissive, or largely dull, depending on your perspective. Finally, Alfredson has this subdued and relaxed voice, almost like Michael McDonald on Valium, and so lacking strength and vigor. In the end, with The Game of Ouroboros I believe Alfredson accomplished what he set out to do, build a progressive rock album around his keyboard skills. However, I'm not entirely sure that it's all that interesting or compelling. I'll probably never give another spin.

THEO - These Are The Simple Days (OFFICIAL)


CraigHartranft.net - New fiction, crime fiction by Craig Hartranft

In Short

With The Game of Ouroboros, I believe Alfredson accomplished what he set out to do, build a progressive rock album around his keyboard skills. Yet I'm not entirely sure that it's all that interesting or compelling.

Find A Review

Alphabetical Index

a b c d e f g h i j
k l m n o p q r s t
u v w x y z #
Loading
Album of the Week
Click to read the Iced Earth - Incorruptible CD Album review

It's been sometime since I heard from Iced Earth. My last Iced Earth review was nine years ago for 2008's The Crucible of Man - Something Wicked Part 2. With all the music that gets pitched my way on a daily, and yearly, basis I'm not ... [ Read More ]