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Inmoria: A Farewell to Nothing The Diary Part 1
Inmoria A Farewell to Nothing The Diary Part 1 album new music review

Inmoria: A Farewell to Nothing ... Part 1

Heavy/Power/Progressive Metal
4.0/5.0

Created in 2008 by former Tad Morose drummer Dan Eriksson, Inmoria returns with their sophomore release A Farewell to Nothing The Diary Part 1 (AFTNTDP1). And once more Inmoria revisits their initial formula: quite intense, significantly dense, surprisingly melodic, and simply powerful heavy metal. (Perhaps with a touch of power and prog for good measure.)

At times Inmoria reminds of Denmark's Manticora (early) with their intensity and density, but with better clarity. Most times, with new singer Soren Nico Adamsen (Artillery) at the mic stand, they remind of a heavier, more forceful, Dio from the late Eighties. If anything, Inmoria proves that modern heavy metal does not have to be harsh or hardcore to deliver blistering intensity.

Starting with the opener Blinded, A Farewell to Nothing The Diary Part 1 comes straight at you with turbocharged bulldozer force. It's a hybrid of heavy and power metal that is simply relentless. But that could be said for much (AFTNTDP1). Hear My Prayers, In My Dreams, and the rabid I Watch My Shadow Fall move at a 'take no prisoners' pace. Yet, the latter song and The Silence Within Me offer these segues, call them interludes or transitions, that lighten the course. Often this is done with atmosphere from the keyboards and spice from a guitar solo.

Considering the keyboards, they provide much depth, but also offer sprinkles of lightness within the dark of the work's heaviness: note Just Another Lie. While the keyboards add to the density, so do the vocal arrangements and chord structure. There's an exaggeration of bombastic riffage to destroy metal veterans and their heel-biting youngsters.

Inmoria can be deliberately intriguing as on Watch Me Bleed where the heaviness coexists with increased melody, an obvious compositional hook, and the sometime speed of power metal. Other times as on The Mirror or Save Me the metal is simply heavy with determined pace. Then for another curve, Inmoria closes with Why, which offers a guest female vocalist (Helena Bylund) over a simple symphonic arrangement.

Fundamentally, however, Inmoria's A Farewell to Nothing The Diary Part 1 is heavy, intense, and intriguing metal. It's 'up in your face' with its power and determination, but offers melodic lines and knotty compositional twists to intrigue. This is good heavy, emphasis on 'heavy', metal, almost a shotgun blast to the gut, but in a good way. Recommended.




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In Short

Fundamentally, Inmoria's A Farewell to Nothing The Diary Part 1 is heavy, intense, and intriguing metal. This is good heavy, emphasis on 'heavy', metal, almost a shotgun blast to the gut, but in a good way.

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