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The Tygers: Second Album
The Tygers Second Album new music review

The Tygers Second Album

Classic Rock
Rating: 3.5/5.0

When I call The Tygers' sophomore release Second Album 'classic rock,' it might be better to call their sound 'vintage' rock. There music is planted firm in the mid to late 1960's, reflecting the sounds of Crosby, Stills and Nash, Buffalo Springfield, or Simon Garfunkel The Tygers rose to regional fame in Milwaukee, and later national attention (with the help of Herb Alpert's A&M Records) with their 1968 single Little by Little. They were quick to cut a debut album, but support and a record deal fell through. (Earlier they were approached by the legend Les Paul to record, but were nixed by their manager). Now forty years later, The Tygers finally bring their Second Album, clever.

I would imagine that most of the readers of Dangerdog Music Review were probably not even born when this era of rock music reigned. I was, and grew up on those fledgling sounds that troubled our parents. However, I'm not that much of an 'oldies' fan, and certainly don't travel the nostalgia circuit. Yet, The Tygers' Second Album isn't exactly a trip down memory lane either. Rather this work is more like 'then is now' or yesterday is today.' I can't think of anyone attempting to do revitalize this vintage rock (whether they are young or original artists). Most bands like The Tygers are playing that 'oldies' circuit, reliving past glory, and not attempting to do anything new. Kudos should be reserved for The Tygers simply because they're composing their music again.

Second Album is filled with diverse musical styles including folk, country, blues, and simple rock. The vocal harmonies are crisp and lush invoking CSNY and Simon and Garfunkel, and reminding us again how important they are to a good song. The Tygers add some clever instrumentation adding saxophone on Voo Doo, Girl Like You, and You Know Where to Reach Me, pedal steel guitar on How Long Does It Take, and clarinet and banjo Never Too Late. All the songs are well crafted with memorable melodies and simple hooks.

The Tygers' Second Album is essentially period music from the 1960's, but made fresh and inviting for our day. If you remember those days or merely want to hear an authentic and vital representation from that time, then you must pick up their Second Album.

CraigHartranft.net - New fiction, crime fiction by Craig Hartranft

In Short

The Tygers' Second Album is essentially period music from the 1960's, but made fresh and inviting for our day. If you remember those days or merely want to hear an authentic and vital representation from that time, then you must pick up their Second Album.

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